Payday Loans

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Robert Young (1907-1998)

 

  1. Warren William, Skyscraper Souls, 1931.   Robert Young, Madge Evans, Una Merkel directed by Harry Beaumont. That’s how MGM announced the high-rise Grand Hotel,which wound up with Warren William, Maureen O’Sullivan, Verree Teasdale helmed, well enough, by Edgar Selwyn.
  2. Gene Raymond,  Sadie McKee, 1933.    For the glib vaudevillian who brings Joan  Crawford to the Big Bad Apple and dumps her for Esther Ralston, director Clarence Brown also saw  James Dunn, Leif Erickson, Arthur Jarrett, Donald Woods. Hollywood Reporter enthused: “Swell picture... sure-fire audience... the stuff the fans cry for...”
  3. Franchot Tone, Love on the Run, 1936.    Last minute change of Barnabus Pells meant that Tone told (probably) the first knock-knock joke in movies. Knock-knock. Who's there? Machiavelli.  Macchiavelli who?  Machiavelli good soup for $10!" Owch, sounds like a Chico Marx reject. 
  4. John  Beal, Double Wedding, 1936.     Change of  Waldo (what else?) in the screwball comedy marking the half-way mark in the 14 William Powell-Myrna Loy movies.
  5. Cary Grant, Suzy, 1937.     Grant popped in from  Paramount to third banana Jean Harlow and Franchot Tone - as the role did not  attract any of  MGM’s upper echelon: Clark Gable, Robert Montgomery, William Powell, Robert Taylor, Spencer Tracy or Young.   
  6. Pat  O’Brien,  Knute Rockne - All American (UK: A Modern Hero), 1939.     “Win one for The Gipper”  is one of the lines in US cinema. And, good grief, Ronnie Reagan made it happen! Trying to rev up a fast imploding career as everyone’s best pal, Reagan suggested that Jack Warner should film the story of Knute,  the legendary Notre Dame football coach. “And I could play George Gipp.” You're too small.  Reagan promptly produced an old photo of him playing college football - he was actually bigger than The Gipper. Bye bye Young,  James Cagney and Spencer Tracy  were  ruled out by Notre Dame University for the biopic of its football coach.  So,  their  pal got his dream role.
  7. Dan Dailey, Panama Hattie, 1941.    Once in the can, the Cole Porter required numerous re-takes.  During which time both Young and the seven years younger William Lundigan were suggested as substitutes for the 17th and final movie billing of… Dan Dailey Jr! 
  8. Robert Taylor,  Bataan, 1942.  Young was announced as George Murphy's co-star in  what appeared to be a re-make of John Ford’s  The Lost Patrol.  Well, MGM had paid $6,500 to use any part of RKO’s 1933  war film.
  9. Gregory Peck, Twelve O'Clock High, 1948.     "Duke told me he'd turned it down," said Peck. "And I seized it!"   Just not that fast… Clark Gable was extremely keen on General Frank Savage. At first, Peck thought it was too similar to Command Decision (which Gable made). He read it again. "A fine film, much honoured and respected, about the psychological stress of total involvement of these men with the bombing of a ball-bearing works in Frankfurt." Just too honest for such a gung-ho movie-hero as Duke. This Peck's finest hour (forget To Kill A Mockingbird). Also in the Brigadier General Savage loop: Dana Andrews, Ralph Bellamy, James Cagney, Van Heflin, Burt Lancaster, Edmond O’Brien and Roberts Montgomery, Preston and Young. I saw it at age 11 and it marked me for life.
  10. Ronald Reagan, Knute Rockne All American, 1949.   “Win one for The Gipper” is one of the lines in US cinema. And, good grief, Ronnie Reagan made it happen! Trying to rev up a fast imploding career as everyone’s best pal, Reagan suggested that Jack Warner should film the story of Knute, the legendary Notre Dame football coach. “And I could play George Gipp.” You're too small. Reagan promptly produced an old photo of him playing college football - he was actually bigger than The Gipper. Bye bye Young, Robert Cummings, William Holden, Dennis Morgan. Oh, and John Wayne.

  11. Robert Mitchum, My Forbidden Past, 1950.   Hard to believe the future telly-doc Marcus Welby in a perfect Mitchum role... sexed up by Howard Hughes. As part of her $150,000 (plus 10%) per film deal, Ann Sheridan had script, director and co-star approval. When Young had to leave, she listed her choices of replacements: Mitchum, Charles Boyer, Richard Conte, John Lund, Franchot Tone. Then, Howard Hughes bought RKO, dumped Sheridan and joined together Mitchum and Ava  Gardner. (Sheridan sued RKO and won big money - and another movie, Appointment in Honduras).
  12. Fred MacMurray, There’s Always Tomorrow, 1955.      Young and Melvyn Douglas were also in the frame for the mid-aged business success with an empty existence until Barbara Stanwyck sashshays back into his life - and not, this time, for him to murder her husband. Despite how it sounds, this is not the usual melo from Douglas Sirk. It’s a man’s not a woman’s picture, for example, and there is damn little gloss on the moss.

 

 





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