Payday Loans
Horst Buchholz (1932-2003)

 

  1. Alain Delon, Rocco e i suoi fratelli/Rocco and his Brothers, Italy, 1960.        He knew Italian maestro Luchino Visconti was interested but the bisexual German was furious on receiving Viscointi's telegram demanding a swimsuit photo.  “How dare he! Well, he can fuck off.” They met years later at Cannes, Buchholz still steaming. Visconti denied any such cable, looked into it and  reported back said that a over zealous assistant  had sent it. Yeah, sure!
  2. Richard Beymer, West Side Story, 1961.        Director Robert Wise's second choice  for Tony.  The first?  Elvis Presley.
  3. Karl-Heinz Boehm, The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, 1961.     The first director, Richard Brooks, selected Germany's James Dean opposite George Hamilton and Alain Delon... The Three Petty Boys of the Apocalypse.  Vincente Minnelli made the pic. Badly.
  4. Omar Sharif, Lawrence of Arabia, 1962.
  5. Alain Delon, Il Gattopardo/The Leopard, Italy-France, 1963.      Luchino Visconti remained keen on the German Dean. Or he did after Warren Beatty rejected him. .However, the French James Dean’s Paris agent was also Visconti’s.
  6. Clint Eastwood, Per un pugno di dollari (UK/US: A Fistful of Dollars), Italy-Spain-West Germany, 1964.     Hotte’s agent warned him off. It’s a Western, yes - but not another Magnificent Seven. It’s some kind of - are you ready for this? - Euro Western!!! Directed by an unknown Italian in Spain. As if other great Western-makers weren’t of Euro origin: the Irish John Ford, French Jacques Tourneur, Alsacian William Wyler, Austrian Fred Zinnemann. Anyway, this was based on was a Japanese film, Kurosawa’s Yojimbo, 1961… in turn inspired by Budd Boetticher’s Buchanan Rides Alone, 1957.
  7. Alain Delon, Lost Command, 1966.       Buchholz was inheriting the French star’s roles in Fanny, Marco The Magnificent, Cervantes, during 1961-67. But he was hardly right for this one - about the French army in what was then called Indochina. Particularly when Delon had actually served in the war there.
  8. Tony Curtis, The Boston Strangler, 1968.       An odd idea for an Italian-American role  - when  Hollywood wanted to re-name him: Henry Buckholt
  9. Peter McEnery, The Cat and the Canary, 1978.       London producer Richard Gordon nearly sued the German star when he suddenly quit the fifth movie version of the Agatha Christie pastiche by 20s’ playwright John Willard. Casting director Rose Tobias Shaw solved the problem: Move McEery from Dr Blythe to Wilder and bring in Daniel Massey as the medico and… checkmate! No one fretted (well, maybe Buchholz) that auteur Radley Metzger was more famous as the New York porno director, Henry Paris.
  10. George de la Penna, Nijinsky, 1980.      First Albert DeSalvo, now Vaslav Nijinsky - an odd place, Hollywood.  No wonder Mr Buckholt left the building!
  11. Christoph Eichhorn, Der Zauberberg (The Magic Mountain), Austria-West Germany-France-Italy, 1981.       Wanted by Visconti for Hans Castorp in his take on Thomas Mann. However the classic novel did not reach screens until Bernard Sinkel’s torpid version, also featuring Rod Steiger, Marie-France Pisier and Hans Christian Blech.

  12. Frank Finlay, Lifeforce, 1984

 

 

 





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