Payday Loans

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George Lazenby

  1. Sean Connery, Diamonds Are Forever, 1969.
  2. James Coburn, Giù la testa (UK: A Fistful of Dynamite; US: Duck You Sucker), Italy, 1971. George was keen - then, he passed. At first, Sergio Leone was to produce only. Peter Bogdanovich was chosen to helm. He hated the script yet his re-writes were so bad that Leone had him sacked and sent home “in Tourist Class” - on studio orders. He’d never liked Bogdanovich when he arrived in Rome with his sister carrying his suitcases like a slave. Sam Peckinpah was next choice but Coburn and Rod Steiger insisted on Leone. Or no deal. “OK, I’ll do it but never ask me today what we’re doing tomorrow.”
  3. Gig Young, The Game of Death,  1978.    The Little Dragon and the ex-007 got on well.  However, on the very night of July 20, 1973,  that Lazenby signed to  join  Shrine of Ultimate Bliss, Lee's next and most  ambitious movie as star and director, the Jeet Kune Do maestro died in mysterious circumstances. He was 32.  Robert Clouse, who made Lee's Hollywood debut, Enter The Dragon, 1973, completed the film with the new, nauseating title. He used all of Lee's directed fights (shot in 1973, and shelved while he made Dragon)   a double in other scenes, a wholly  different Western  cast. Plus (tasteless) shots of Lee's coffin and funeral.
  4. Kenneth Colley,  Live of Brian, 1979. John Cleese's “absolutely hilarious” suggestion  for Jesus... with a credit line reading: George Lazenby IS Jesus Christ! Lazenby's agent insisted that George was overseas working on another film.
  5. Sean Connery, Never Say Never Again, 1983.





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