Payday Loans
Ian Ogilvy

  1. Michael York, The Taming of the Shrew, 1966.     The two would-be Lucentios - and their potential Biancas - flew to Rome together to test for Zeffirelli. "I think we all realised that the impending trial could alter at least one of our lives," York commented. "After dining - and especially wining - we agreed with sporting, if hypocritical, largesse that as we all liked each other so much it didn't matter who won the roles... Such bullshit! [Laugh]. You know how anxious you always are as an actor, and how cruel this business is, and the audition process is something you never put behind you.” Ogilvy later succeeded Roger Moore as TV's Saint and disappeared into lacklustre series Americana.
  2. George Lazenby, On Her Majesty's Secret Service, 1969.
  3. Roger Moore, For Your Eyes Only, 1981.
  4. Nicholas Ball, Lifeforce, 1984.
  5. Peter Firth, Lifeforce, 1984.  
  6. Michael Jayston, Doctor Who #143: The Trial of a Time Lord, 1986.      Seen for the Prosecutor, an “intermediate” future incarnation of the Doctor known as the Valeyard. Doc6 Colin Baker being tried by the High Council of Time Lords on their home planet of Gallifrey - for breaking several rules including interference with outside worlds and… genocide. Inspired by A Christmas Carol, the 14-episode past-present-future arc lasted the entire Season 23.At this juncture, the franchise was as much on trial as The Doctor.
  7. Simon Williams, Doctor Who #148: Remembrance Of The Daleks, TV, 1988.     Despite the importance of the show - the 25th anniversary season opener -   eleven actors passed on Group Captain Gilmore. Ogilvy, Tom Adams, Nicholas Ball, Tom Chadbon, Michael Cochrane, Lewis Collins, Del Henney, Tim Pigott-Smith, Neil Stacy, Simon Ward and James Warwick. Enter: Williams, aka James Bellamy in Upstairs, Downstairs, the Downton Abbey of its day - TV, 1971-1975. Despite 106 screen credits, Ogilvy never entered the Whoverse - but managed achapter of Hollywood’s Babylon 5 in 1998.





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