Payday Loans
Keith Carradine

  1. Ryan O'Neal, Love Story, 1970.
  2. John Savage, Steelyard Blues, 1973.      Co-producer Julia Phillips managed to get Donald Sutherland to read with Carradine - but Sutherland was  "too threatened  by his  looks" and vetoed him.
  3. Allan Nichols, Nashville, 1974.       “I wasn’t even supposed to be Tom. Originally, I was going to be Bill. They wanted Gary Busey for Tom, which was much more on the money in terms of Gary’s energy and personality. It would have made much more sense on first blush.” When Busey was busy, Altman moved Carradine up to leader of the band: an amoral rocker. Every woman in the audience felt his I’m Easy was aimed at them]. “Never felt right. I did not like him. What you see is a guy who doesn’t like himself. It’s brilliant. It’s the truth. I wish I could say I was such a good actor. It had nothing to do with acting. It’s the genius of Bob putting me in a circumstance that made me really uncomfortable…” Nicholls was one of the three writers of Altman’s A Wedding, 1977.
  4. John Savage, Hair, 1979.      “They were panicking about the person chosen to play Claude was tied up with another film  and asked me.  I really had my doubts about what it could be as a film... Ironically, after graduating from high school,  my closest friend was in the army and I was in Hair.”
  5. Max von Sydow,  Flash Gordon, 1980.      UK director Nicolas Roeg's choice for Ming The Merciless before Mike Hodges made it. "It was  like Churchill having  the  right  to  burn  the Sutherland painting," Nic told me in London.. He had an agreement  with Dino De Laurentiis:  "Do you want me to go on the way I'm going?  We got through a year like that and were within a month of starting when he  said:  "This  is  not  the  Flash  Gordon  I wanted to do. Therefore,  you go  [he mimed signing  a  cheque] or stay. Produce it with me!"  Nic Roeg said: "Dino, I'm for hire but I'm not for sale." 
  6. Edward Albert, Galaxy of Terror, 1981.  One son-of-the-famous for another as Eddie Albert’s lad  beat John  Carradine’s for Cabren,  hero and  senior officer of the spacecraft Quest on a rescue mission to the mystery planet Morganthus. Bill Paxton was the set dresser and the art and second unit director was James Cameron -  in fact, this gig won him a contentious helming debut, Piranha II: The Spawning, 1980. "I was replaced after two-and-a-half weeks by the Italian producer."
  7. Gary Busey, Lethal Weapon, 1986.     There were 39 possibles for Mel Gibson’s suicidal cop.  Just seven  for his bad man target, Mr Joshua. John Saxon was first choice - but  he was having A Nightmare on Elm, Street: Dream Warriors.  Next up: Carradine, Scott Glenn, Tommy Lee Jones, Ron Perlman, Christopher Walken, James Woods… and a slimmed-down Busey.  He said the role rescued his career.
  8. Brad Davis, The Caine Mutiny Court-Martial., TV, 1988.
    In retrospect, I should’ve done it. recalled Carradine. After Nashville, Bob never invited me again until… he called me to play Queeg.   I was absolutely terrified by the ghost of Humphrey Bogart. Frankly, I didn’t have the balls to confront that. At the same time, I was married, I had two kids, and I was offered another project, also for television, with Glenn Close. I could either do [Stones For Ibarra] for $250,000 or I could do this with Bob for $60,000. I called him and I was absolutely straight with him. ‘Bob, I can’t afford it. I got kids to feed, I got to make some money, and I’ve got this thing and they’re going to pay me a lot of money.’ And he said: ‘Oh, I understand, I understand.’ He didn’t understand. Nobody turns Bob Altman down.  And that was the last time he asked me. And in retrospect, I should’ve done it… I regret to this day that I didn’t do it. He got Brad Davis, who was terrific. But hey man, you make your choices and you live with them, If I had it to do over again, I wouldn’t make the same choice.

  9. Dwight Schulz, Fat Man and Little Boy, 1989.       The  A-Bomb father Robert  J Oppenheimer was perfect for Carradine,  but went to "Howling Mad" Murdoch of TV's A Team  - a B-actor.
  10. Joseph Fiennes, Sinbad: Legend of the Seven Seas, 2002.  In the DreamWorks voicing mix for Proteus were Fiennes, David Arquette, Paul Bettany, Keith Carradcine, Jeff Goldblume  and  Robin Williams.


 





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